Krishna Baidya’s Random Musings

Posts Tagged ‘Netbook

Gartner predicts that worldwide sales of smartphones will grow by 29 percent year-on-year to reach 180 million units in 2009, overtaking notebooks in total unit terms. The research firm adds that it expects smartphone sales revenue to reach US$191 million by 2012, higher than end user spending on mobile PCs, which is forecast to reach US$152 million by the same point. Currently smartphones account for 14 percent of overall mobile device sales, but Gartner expects by 2012 they will make up around 37 percent of global handset sales. However, it adds that the PC vendors’ cumulative share (Apple excluded) of the smartphone market has remained static at around 1 percent and is unlikely to rise above 2 percent during the next three years, highlighting the challenges faced by PC vendors looking to tap into smartphones.

“PC vendors will find it difficult to simply use existing supply chains and channels to expand their presence in the smartphone market,” said Roberta Cozza, principal research analyst at Gartner. “The smartphone and notebook markets are governed by different rules when it comes to successfully marketing and selling products.” Gartner notes that PC vendors have traditionally introduced smartphones based on the Windows Mobile platform, which have mainly attracted business users. But it adds that PC vendors will face extreme challenges in having to adapt and base their smartphone offerings on a consumer-focused value proposition based on short life cycles, fashion design, hardware and software platform diversity.

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Came across the following story about “Courier” – Microsoft’s planned Tablet.

Some nifty features and all …. but will this be something of a game changing?  Read through and decide for yourself.

500x_courier4Mashable waxed poetic about Apple’s mythical Tablet recently (and even seen some more evidence to support it). But Microsoft, too, has a rather attractive looking tablet-like device in the speculative stages as well: the Courier.

Now, a leaked video of the Courier’s user interface sheds more light on some of the design aesthetic behind this still unconfirmed device that appears to be part tablet and part digital planner, with a dual-screen hinged design and pen and finger controls.

In the video, unearthed by Gizmodo, we see a very fluid interface where any item can be drag and dropped easily. The overarching metaphor is apparently dubbed the “infinite journal,” where items can be clipped and stored from the web, annotated and highlighted, moved around, and modified with a palette of drawing and design tools. An on-board camera handles bringing in visuals and documents from the physical world as well. Everything is searchable for later retrieval, with a Courier Pen handling text input duties. Of course the device overall is a touchscreen, and designed with finger control and gestures in mind as well.

Easy Publishing, But No Apps?

According to the video, publishing from your Infinite Journal is easy, with pages and sections exporting to Courier files, Powerpoint presentations, or PDFs. And according to Mary-Jo Foley, the device will run Windows 7 … but not be able to install Windows 7 applications. Say what? Yep — apparently that’s because someone up high thinks the first generation of Microsoft Tablets failed because the apps weren’t specific to the form factor. There could be some truth in there but still — we hope for Microsoft’s sake they come up with a better alternative app store than what they’ve done with the Zune HD to-date.

Check out the video below and let us know what you think: are you sweating this device? Which interests you more: the mythical Apple Tablet, or the mythical Microsoft Courier?

Source:

Thought of sharing this write up that talks about how netbook pricing holds key to the embedded future. Has some good arguments that is in align with my thought too.

“The fledgling market for 3G-enabled netbooks was given a big boost this month as the leading U.S. operators moved to embrace this new device class. AT&T announced that this summer it will begin selling mini-laptops with embedded 3G modems from Acer, Dell, Lenovo and others in 2,200 stores nation-wide and online, while Verizon Wireless Communications stores began selling their first netbook – the HP Mini 1151NR.

For AT&T, Verizon and other operators in Europe and Asia, rolling out netbooks is another step towards the creation of a potentially much larger and more strategic market for mobile broadband connectivity in a wide range of consumer electronics and industrial devices, from cameras to games consoles to energy meters to environmental sensors. In a sign of operators’ growing interest in this opportunity, there will be a panel session devoted to the “The New Embedded Mobile Economy” at the GSMA’s Telecoms Marketplace at HiT Barcelona on June 18th.

But the size of the embedded mobile economy is going to depend heavily on the cost of the mobile broadband modules, which is going to depend on the economies of scale available to module manufacturers. In other words, it is a bit of a chicken or egg situation.

Although there are already 68 HSPA embedded modules available from more than a dozen suppliers, according to the GSMA, the market itself is still relatively small. The mobile broadband modem market in Europe, including USB modem devices, PC Cards, ExpressCards, and internal cellular modems for laptops and mini-laptops, reached only 10.5 million units last year, according to Telecompaper. The market research group didn’t break out how many of these units were internal modules, but it doesn’t expect sales of computers with embedded modems to overtake external modems until 2012.

Of course, independent of the PC connectivity market, mobile broadband modems are being added to other devices today. Amazon’s successful Kindle electronic reader is spawning imitators, while the GSMA has identified 15 consumer electronics devices, including cameras, watches and media players, with built-in HSPA modems.

Even so, it is still laptops, and particularly the netbook segment, that is most likely to create the initial scale needed to bring down module prices significantly. While there are signs of strong latent demand for 3G netbooks, potential buyers are bound to be very price-sensitive in the current economic climate. If mobile operators want the wider embedded market to emerge in a significant way in the short-to-medium term, they are going to have to price and promote their 3G netbooks aggressively.”